Our History

At La Marche in Minneapolis, Minnesota a new Constitution & Bylaws and obligation adopted.

During the convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, The American Legion Auxiliary voted to disallow the Eight and Forty to be a subsidiary organization.

At the American Legion Auxiliary Convention in New York the service of “lung and other respiratory diseases was added.”

The National Executive Committee confirms the addition of the disease of Cystic Fibrosis.

The National Children and Youth Commission gives verbal approval to include the disease Cystic Fibrosis.

First Nurses Scholarships were made for the school year 1957-1958.

Special project of scholarship for registered nurses to encourage them to go into Tuberculosis work started.

Auxiliary recognizes Eight and Forty as a subsidiary.

The American Legion assigned to the Eight and Forty the special assignment of “preventative Tuberculosis service along educational lines and with financial assistance in providing care and treatment of children. The American Legion assigns National Jewish Hospital as a program. Child Welfare donations dedicated to projects in national scope of respiratory work in children.

A representative of the Eight and Forty added as advisory member of the National Child Welfare Commission.

New York, following Paris, France Convention, the Auxiliary gives recognition of Eight and Forty as an affiliated organization.

Omaha Legion Convention recognized Eight and Forty as a playground and honor society.

At the third La Marche Nationale in St. Paul, Minnesota, “service particularly concerned with Child Welfare” was added. Service replaced fun as the first objective followed by Fun and Fellowship.

October 1923 second Marche held in San Francisco, California. Child Welfare program adopted. May Day and collection of funds for child welfare work instigated.

In Indianapolis, Indiana the Eight and Forty is organized as a playground society for Auxiliary members as a sister organization to the 40/8, the fun organization of The Legion. In New Orleans Legion Convention the Eight and Forty is recognized as a sister organization by the 40/8. First Marche in New Orleans October 1922. Mrs. Ada Sangster of Michigan was the first National Chapeau.